Friends of Combe Valley Newsletter No. 3

Spring is on its way – but the wildlife has already sprung a surprise!

Here are two new additions to the the 3,000 other species in the Valley – Egyptian Geese and a White Stork.

Egyptian Goose – Alopochen aegyptiacus
White Stork – Ciconia ciconia
This White Stork has flown in from the Knepp Valley collection – West Sussex
Egyptian Geese were introduced as ornamental birds – and have now gone wild.

The number of wildfowl in the Valley reached 1,000 and 200 Shoveler Ducks (Anas Clypeata) were seen on Crowhurst Lake – a nationally significant amount. Four sea-going Scaup Ducks also landed on our fresh water flood causing Twitchers to twitch!

Local History

Friends of Combe Valley have been very busy indeed, running the Warden Service, staffing the Cafe at the Discovery Centre and reporting pollution. We have also been busy researching local history.

It seems that in the period 1932 to 1934, Sir Alan Cobham, the daring air ace, wrote to Hastings Council asking them to clear an area at Pebsham for an aerodrome to convey fruit and vegetables from France. During the preparations, a digger driver unearthed a Norman Longboat, complete with ‘Dragon’s Head’ prow. Noted historian Kathleen Tyson has pointed out that Flemish traders came to Bulverhythe Harbour in the period 1000 AD to 1100 AD and therefore the ‘Dragon’s Head’ could actually be a Dacian Wolf Head which the Flemish used when copying the Normans. You can see a Dacian Wolf Head in this image from the Bayeux Tapestry.

Bayeux Tapestry by unknown makers – Wikimedia Commons

So what happened to the Longboat? Well, the Council were alarmed that the discovery might delay the building of the aerodrome, so they told the digger driver to re-bury it. It was then reburied, it is estimated – near the join of Tier 1 and Tier 2 of Bulverhythe Recreation Ground. Pebsham aerodrome was then built on Tier 2.

Could this Tier 1 wet site at Bulverhythe be the hiding place of a Longboat?

But the story does not stop there – because firstly, some local residents claim that when Tier 1 floods in winter, the Norman Longboat eerily rises up – its prow can be seen – and then as the spring weather arrives so it sinks back down. To make matters even more complicated, an avid local historian claims that the Longboat was buried under a concrete raft in the car park of the Waterworks near the A259. Plainly if this is true it cannot ‘rise up’. So Friends of Combe Valley asked the County Archaeologist, Neil Griffin, about the best way to preserve it. He replied that Hastings Borough Council would need their permission to build more than 10 houses on the site and so if planning goes ahead for the 192 homes, then a full desk and onsite check has to be made by the ESCC County staff. No planning application has yet been made. Nevertheless, Bulverhythe was an early medieval harbour with tidal fish traps so there may be several heritage boats to be found.

Sad Story of a Spitfire CrashUpper Wilting – Monkham Wood

We are coming soon to the Victory In Europe Commemoration on 8th May 2020 – VE Day – and we all have seen films showing the sacrifice that so many made to keep us free. During the Battle of Britain, we lost a young pilot who was shot down near Upper Wilting Farm. Here’s the story but with a request to be careful when walking there:

Walkers are reminded that the area of Monkham Wood and Monkham Mead next to Upper Wilting Farm, Crowhurst is sensitive as it is the location of the World War II fatal crash site of a Spitfire shot down by a Nazi fighter on 30th October 1940 at midday. The aircraft was flown by Pilot Officer A. E. Davies. It is legally protected by the Protection of Military Remains Act 1986 and the crash site is monitored by the Ministry of Defence Business Services Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre, Innsworth House, Gloucester. Full details of this and many other World War II incidents, including fighter and bomber crashes and V1 rocket attacks in the Valley vicinity will be published in the next Friends of Combe Valley charity newsletter. VE Day 75th anniversary is on 8th May 2020.

More background to this incident: A member of the Hastings Area Archaeological Research Group found the following report of wartime memories:

‘Mrs Pelling remembers life as a child at Wilting (called Wilton on 1813 maps) during the war years of the 1940s when air raids were common and almost every farm in the area had its own war incident. In the case of Wilting, a plane crashed at the southern end of Monkham Mead about October 1940 during the Battle of Britain.

The crash was witnessed by many people in the Crowhurst area and although the remains of the aircraft were removed by an Aircraft Historical Society, it has left its mark – a shallow depression.

Spitfire – Wikimedia Commons

Not surprising after this distance of time – not all the recollections tally exactly but it seems that the aircraft, a Spitfire, was shot down by cannon fire from German fighter one Wednesday morning.

The pilot was seen trying to get out of the plane as it fell but was killed by the impact of the crash. The plane itself fell apart during the descent and one of the wings fell off into Hollington Park.

Mr G Drew who lived nearby was one of the first on the scene and pulled the pilot’s body from the stricken aircraft and wrapped it in sacking.

Later the poor man’s family came from Coventry to collect the remains, while the authorities collected some pieces of the Spitfire.’

Visit of the Deputy Chief Constable – Jo Shiner

Will Kemp, DCC Jo Shiner and some friends walking their dogs

On 10th January 2020, we were honoured to receive a visit to Combe Valley by DCC Jo Shiner of Sussex Police. She met the Wardens, saw Upper Wilting Farm and the Greenway and Crowhurst Lake. It was a fine sunny day and so lots of walkers were out with their dogs and she and her staff officer Police Sergeant Martyn Waterson were able to stop and chat.

David Dennis, Will Kemp, PCSO Daryl Holter and DCC Jo Shiner

Also accompanying us was PCSO Daryl Holter, the Sussex Heritage and Wildlife Crime officer. We discussed the vandalism and motorcycle theft and burning taking place in the Valley but also the wonderful opportunity to strengthen community metal health by getting people to know and walk in the Valley.

DCC Jo Shiner talks to a budding police officer – maybe!

Crowhurst Footpath

Every winter the section of the 1066 Trail from Crowhurst Cricket Ground near the Plough pub to the open fields and Crowhurst Lake, becomes a morass of mud – and more recently two parts of it began to slip down into the Powdermill Stream, causing someone to fall into the brambles.

Mud, mud – inglorious mud!

Previously, East Sussex County Council had explained that since they had over 2,000 miles of footpaths (the same distance as the roads in East Sussex), they could not afford to repair the very muddy section. However, now that ESCC footpath engineers have studied the path, they agree that action IS required. So, as soon as the path dries sufficiently, then temporary repairs will be made – and then in 2021-2022 financial year, the whole path will be properly and safely repaired.

Natural winter-flooding at Three Bridges on the 1066 Trail in Combe Valley

They did also point out that the 1066 Trail is not part of the national trail network – although it does connect to it – but is in fact a path devised by Rother District Council. In the longer term it may be possible to build a bund across the Valley to permit walkers to cross the Combe Haven in winter. At present the crossover points at Three Bridges are deep in the flood and impassable.

Redundant Power Cables

During the late Spring, Power Network UK engineers will remove the redundant electrical cables, telegraph pole and switch boxes from the Bulverhythe Path – and also the power cable that is hanging from the cliffs at Galley Hill.

The old GEC power unit now owned by Power Networks UK and to be removed soon.

Crime in the Valley

Sadly, there are people in our community who want to wreck the Valley or misuse it in a criminal way. Here are a series of photos showing you the kinds of things that are happening – fly tipping, vandalism, stolen motorbikes and other matters now under police investigation. Please can you report anything suspicious to us via the Warden contact email –

team@friendsofcombevalley.co.uk

Fly tipping at Pebsham
Fly tipping at Pebsham
Vandalism at the Discovery Centre

Cleaning Up Combe Valley

We were setting up a comprehensive clean-up campaign but Coronavirus has made life complicated – so please follow our Facebook page @CombeValley to see the latest situation. At present, volunteers are called for to help us clean up the Bulverhythe Recreation Ground area on Saturday 4th April at 10.00 ( for two hours) meeting at the Discovery Centre in Freshfields.

Stolen and burned bicycle at Bulverhythe Recreation Ground Tier 2

History and Wildlife Presentations

As soon as we know when the Coronavirus emergency has come to an end, we will be giving local history and wildlife presentations at the Discovery Centre cafe. The first presentation will be The History of Bulverhythe, followed one month later by The History of Crowhurst. Please follow our Facebook page to see when these events can go ahead. Friends of Combe Valley members may come free of charge and non-members will be asked to pay £5.00 including tea/coffee and biscuits. These presentations by David Dennis are likely to start at 7pm and last for around 1 hour to 1.5 hours The scope of the presentation will cover, the origin of the landscape, Ice Age, Stone Age, Iron Age, Roman occupation, Norman invasion, Medieval history and modern history of each area – including World War I and II. The third presentation will be a detailed look at the seasonal wildlife of our lovely Valley.

Woodland Trust Season CheckNature’s Calendar

The Woodland Trust is carrying out research into when seasons start and how much change there is due to global warming, sea level rises and other factors that might affect animals and plants. If you are the kind of naturalist who records the first sighting of a bee, or butterfly, or the dates that flowers open in Spring – then this survey is for you. Here’s the link:

https://naturescalendar.woodlandtrust.org.uk/?fbclid=IwAR3b_T115s_6wSdCeb-fc-oX1RKs5EpumKP5Mat03pwNDzvAKK9fgVSrOJw

Goodbye for now – and thanks

Thanks for reading this newsletter and supporting our charity which is dedicated to the preservation of landscape, wildlife and education of the public. The next newsletter will give more details of our schools tree-planting and wildlife education programme – and two new websites we are developing.

All the very best to all of you – and please stay safe.

David E P Dennis LCGI RAF

Trustee, Fundraiser and Warden Co-ordinator

team@friendsofcombevalley.co.uk

Unless otherwise stated under a photo – all images are copyright of David E P Dennis 2020

Friends of Combe Valley Newsletter No 1.

3rd November 2019

Combe Valley Winter Flood 27th October 2019

Introduction

Welcome to the first edition of our Valley Newsletter. I will send it out, not monthly or weekly but whenever there is something important to communicate. Please ‘like it’ so that you always get a copy whenever it is published.

Filsham Reed Beds

There is some confusion about the long term maintenance of Sussex Wildlife Trust’s (SWT) Filsham Reed Beds SSSI. Facebook has an article saying that there will be a 10-month long programme of improvements, including the removal of willow, cutting of reeds and restoring the lake in front of what used to be the bird hide but is now a wicker fence.

Filsham Reed Beds – the clogged-up lake – 15th October 2019

However, a senior executive at SWT has written to me telling me that this might not happen after all.

Here is an extract from his letter:

‘With regard to reedbed management, we do not believe a significant increase in resource or effort to create more open water would increase the ecological diversity of the site, as current habitat management is evidentially increasing ecological diversity, and as such we are confident that we have a strong ecological mandate for continued practice.

The aesthetics vs ecological benefit of open water vs reedbed is something that could continue to be communicated through interpretation including education events and literature. The focus on small-scale, sustained and sustainable effort to increase diversity within a manageable area must be set against the disadvantages of short-term capital investment that could achieve short-term visual effects, but could not be maintained over time without long-term input of extra resource and effort.’

I have written back to SWT CEO Tor Lawrence to obtain clarification of the two contrasting pieces of information. Lake or no Lake that is the question?

Solar Panels

Hastings Borough Council has been working to put solar panel farms into Hastings Country Park, and onto farmland it owns at Upper and Lower Wilting Farms. However, there is now a new development in this saga.

Before Amber Rudd MP resigned as an MP during the recent and seemingly everlasting Brexit fiasco, she wrote to the Chair of Hastings Borough Council telling him to stop putting the solar panel farm into Hastings Country Park and instead, put them on top of the Combe Valley Tip site. I managed to get hold of a copy of that letter. It explains that over 1,500 people in Hastings wrote to Amber protesting, so she took the line of least resistance and suggested the panels be dumped onto us and our Valley. However, I am told that this idea is now ‘dead’ and that Upper Wilting and Hastings Country Park are back in the frame.

Rare Creaturesand where to find them

Combe Valley is not well known nationally. It still has many areas where no close examination of the wildlife has taken place. When out walking please do report anything you find which looks unusual. You may have seen the beetle and spiders I found last week. We still don’t have a name for the beetle but we know now that the wolf spiders are fairly rare.

Valley-wide Communications

Conversations with people on the various committees and organisations have revealed the view that a better forum is needed for the Valley. At present we have FoCV, CIC, Groundwork, HBC, Rother DC, ESCC, Crowhurst Environmental, Bulverhythe Protectors, the farming and local social communities and the rural police patrols – but it would surely be better if once in a while we had a Valley-wide conference for the betterment of the Valley, its wildlife and landscape. Please let me know how you feel about it.

Footbridge at Harley Shute

When you walk up from the back of Filsham Reed Beds to Harley Shute Road, you come to a pretty poor patch of land with a gate onto the road right by the very narrow road bridge over the railway. You then have to take your life in your hands to cross over to the other side, to get onto the big metal bridge near the school. I have suggested that a footbridge be built at this point so that those walking up from the bottom of Filsham Road area near Judges Postcards can use the South Saxons path as a route to Filsham Reed Beds without being run over. The bridge would need to curve in an arc from the patch of trees to the scrub land above the Reed Bed path. A HBC counsellor is looking at the idea.

Reedswood Road Footpath

This dangerous path from the housing estate to the Filsham Reed Beds path is in a sorry state. I have asked ESCC if they will repair it but they say it is not a county path so the answer is no. It might be possible for FoCV to raise funds to repair it – but it would need some input from the people who live on the estate who use it as an access point to the Valley.

1066 Trail National Footpath

We now come to an important project – the attempt to make the 1066 Trail into a footpath that can be used by people in wheelchairs. Part of the Trail at Three Bridges is flooded. The path from Crowhurst Cricket Ground is so muddy as to be dangerous. I went to Wales to the Cors Caron National Nature Reserve to study their 40-year life weatherproof trackway (see photo). They have six kilometres of this. To put one kilometre of this track (with passing places) down for wheelchairs from Bulverhythe to Filsham Reed Beds would cost £350,000 inc VAT.

A similar cost would have to be paid for the Crowhurst to Crowhurst Lake greenway track. Ambiental were asked by me on 31 Oct if there was any reason why this track would interfere with their riverside bunds, if the housing development did go ahead – they said no, the concept of a trackway was fine.

To reach Filsham Reed Beds would require a side bridge to the existing river bridge to keep the trackway on the same level.

In the central Valley at Three Bridges the flood water gets to be three to four feet deep. Rother DC Chair Terry Byrne has suggested a stabilised Pontoon Bridge to connect Crowhurst to the southern slope. This type of bridge always stays just above the water level regardless of its depth.

So gradually the idea of connecting up the paths to enable people with disabilities to move about is taking shape. Please let me know what you think about these ideas.

Landscaping Improvements near the Discovery Centre.

The area nearer the Discovery Centre has a lot of fly tipping,

but it also has a woodland corridor with lots of insects including many ichneumon wasps.

We could plant more trees and sow wild flower meadow seeds to encourage more wildlife, especially pollinators. I am asking Rother Environment Department to help us clear away the fly-tipping rubbish (see photos). Please let me know if you would like to help me landscape this area to make it beautiful.

Fishing in the Valley

There is an absolute legal ban on fishing anywhere inside the Valley Park. Of course, if you are on the Caravan Site bank of the Combe Haven then you are not inside the park, but if you are on the Bulverhythe side then you are banned from fishing. The police have been asked to arrest anyone fishing in any lake, stream or river but they also say it is up to ESCC to put up signs telling the public that fishing is banned. Illegal fishing and the leaving of rubbish goes on at Little Bog Lake, Pebsham Lake and Crowhurst Lake (see photos).

The Combe Valley Warden

Because of the damage done in the Valley by vandals – the burning of the reed beds, the cutting of fences, smashing of bat boxes and bird hide panels, the police have begun to take a very close look at what goes on in the Valley. FoCV have been awarded £2,000 by the Police and Crime Commissioner and I have put in a bid to the Police Community Fund for another £500.00 for equipment for the Warden. PCSO Julie Pearce-Martin and PCSO Daryl Holter are the Rural and Heritage patrol officers.

The Deputy Chief Constable Jo Shiner, her PA and staff officers will be visiting the Valley in November. I am working to set up the Warden Service soon and will be letting you know how to volunteer for the post – which will be a completely volunteer post but with a small monthly allowance. A set of safety equipment will be issued to the chosen warden together with patrol area information. This is entirely a FoCV project not connected to the CIC, groundwork, Sussex Wildlife or any other organisation, so the Warden’s reports will come to us but then be shared where appropriate. The money is ring-fenced and spending will be inspected by the PCC.

Walking for physical and mental health & car parking

The police have asked me why it is that so few people are seen out walking by them when they do their Valley patrols. In a recent tour around by police, only one dog walker was seen during a 2.5 hour trip. People have commented to me that the reason few people walk the Valley trails is that there are no large car parks. The lack of car parks is being discussed by Rother DC and I hope to be able to give you some news about it soon. I also hope that soon we can start to co-ordinate some guided walks for qualified walk leaders so that they can take over and safely increase the footfall.

Tier 1 Housing Development

The anti-flood mechanism final details are not likely to be revealed until at least January and formal planning permission will be sought in the Spring – April or May we think. One puzzle is that if Ambiental put a non-return valve into the river – how will the fish that come through the valve when it is open, be able to get back upstream – they are not leaping salmon?

I am sure that a great deal more about the deeply complex plan to stop flooding on a natural flood plain will come to light over the next weeks, but HBC must remain in ‘purdah’ until after the General Election. Ambiental staff told me that This project is quite a challenge compared to our usual industrial estate flood prevention work – but we will not propose anything which will not work – as if it failed, then our reputation as a company would be ruined.’

Well, that’s the end of the First Edition. I hope you will ‘like’ and ‘follow’ this newsletter. Kind regards and all the very best. David.

Text and photos copyright 2019 David E P Dennis LCGI RAF

Fundraiser Friends of Combe Valley National Charity 1163581