Friends of Combe Valley Newsletter No. 2

AGM

The first Annual General Meeting of the Friends of Combe Valley national charity 1163581 is to take place on Friday December 13th at 18.30 hours in the Discovery Centre, Freshfields Road, Bexhill TN38 8AY

Discovery Centre Cafe, Freshfields Road, Bexhill, TN38 8AY – Free Parking

All members are invited. Voting will take place for the election of the Chair and Trustees. A number of organisations with interest in or responsibility for the Combe Valley Countryside Park, have been invited by letter.

Valley Familiarisation tour for Rother DC Chair

Chair of Rother District Council – Counsellor Terry Byrne visiting Pebsham Lake

The Chair of Rother District Council, Cllr Terry Byrne accompanied me on a tour of Combe Valley on Thursday 5th December. We visited Pebsham Lake, Upper Wilting Farm, the 1066 Trail at Crowhurst and viewed the locations of Little Bog and Decoy Lakes and Adams Farm.

Warden Service

I attended a meeting at the Police and Crime Commissioner’s office in Lewes on Monday 2nd December. I gave a briefing on the Warden Service and met many people who shared our interest in preserving wildlife and landscape and helping the public to be safe. I also met a group patrolling the South Downs National Park on horseback, a group helping people with sight impairment or blindness to receive newsletters by sound recording and another group who were working on a re-wilding project with schools in Hastings. The Police and Crime Commissioner talked to us all and a reporter from the Brighton Argus interviewed us. The meeting was videoed. FoCV thank the PCC and Chief Constable for the £2,500.00 donated to help us keep Combe Valley users safe and wildlife protected.

Warden Service equipment

Part of the police and PCC funding can be used for the purchase of equipment to remove dangerous items such as bags, barrels, shopping trolleys, tins and fly tipping rubbish from valley locations, some of which are difficult to reach. Long telescopic poles (of up to 24 feet) with claw grabber ends are being purchased. We hope now that a major clear-up of the Valley will begin. Wardens will also be issued with waders and first aid kits. A Lone Worker health & safety policy is being established.

Website

Natural annual flooding – the view from the 1066 Trail crossing point at ‘Three Bridges’

It has been difficult for people wanting to become new members or to support our efforts to join or donate. FoCV will be setting up a website with information on our activities and also a payments page for membership and donations, using PayPal and the bank BACS system. Data Protection laws will be implemented in full.

Projects

Following a conversation with FoCV members at a meeting last month, I have been discussing a landscaping and re-wilding project with Rother DC Chair and a senior planner. The concept is finding favour and will be further reported on in subsequent newsletters. The next stage is to identify the landowner(s) – that is now underway. The following stage will be to submit the detailed plan with diagrams to the CIC for approval by Cllr Ruby Cox and the CIC contracted management organisation – Groundwork and to the landowner, if it is not Rother DC.

The project will be aimed at volunteers and schools who would like to help to plant trees and shrubs, to develop reed beds in two new lakes, to make a woodland trail feature and sow wild flowers suitable for pollinators. New habitats for butterflies, insects and birds will be developed with specialist advice from Sussex Wildlife Trust. The proposed project sites will be the area surrounding the Discovery Centre and the edges of the woodland at Tier 2 of Bulverhythe Recreation Ground. The existing sports field and facilities will not be affected. The projects will be funded by grants from organisations supporting tree planting and wildlife enhancement.

Crowhurst flooding

You can see from the two pictures above that the Powdermill Stream has burst its banks on occasions and Environment Agency Flood Warnings have been posted for Crowhurst Village three times in the last month (Nov).

I have been to see the Crowhurst Environmental group for 2.5 hours of detailed discussions to elicit their view of the Park development and preservation of wildlife areas and the natural winter-flood landscape. The Crowhurst group wish there to be minimal interference with the ‘wildness’ of the landscape and are not in favour or ‘urbanisation’ into some sort of beautified parkland. During the meeting it was plain that Crowhurst residents have great concerns about flooding. They explained that they were worried that if the Tier 1 housing estate flood plain management scheme went ahead, it would make it even more likely that Crowhurst cricket ground and local housing would become flooded again. This is because the Powdermill stream is slow to drain away, as it has little gradient and the Greenway edges do not prevent the stream from bursting its banks, as can be seen in the photos. No member of the Ambiental flood consultants or any member of Hastings Borough Council has yet been to reassure the Crowhurst Environmental Group or the local residents of Crowhurst.

Flood plain building meeting

There is to be a meeting with Hastings Borough Council on 13th January 2020 at which group representatives from FoCV, Bulverhythe Protectors and Hastings Urban Design Group and others will be invited to put their point of view.  However, it will not be possible for any group to see or comment on the final plans of the flood remediation scheme as they have not been completed. Therefore we do not know where the earth or concrete banks or bunds are to be located, nor we do we know where the balancing lakes and non-return valves are to be placed. However, if the plan is refused by the Environment Agency or by the Secretary of State for the Environment upon Appeal, then what could the Tier 1 site look like? Here is the original concept diagram when HBC pledged to keep a ‘green space’ between Bexhill and St Leonards.

CIC and Groundwork meeting

There is to be a joint meeting of FoCV, the CIC and Groundwork on 21st January 2020 at the Discovery Centre at which the initial overview of the Park development plan will be discussed. More details and timing will be published in the next newsletter.

Seaside clean-up

We hope to organise beach clean-up sessions covering the long shoreline inside the Countryside Park boundary. We will be calling for volunteers.

The CIC and Groundwork have direct responsibility for a very big shoreline (see map below).

Dog waste-powered streetlamps!

It is now possible to buy machines that burn dog-waste and turn it into methane which then powers streetlamps. Smaller burn units might be purchased to place at the end of main footpaths so that dog-walkers could use them to burn the waste bags rather than leaving them hanging in the bushes.

Wildlife seen

Here’s a gallery selection of wildlife seen in the Valley in the past month.

Also seen were Long-tailed Tits, Buzzards, Little Egrets, Pochards, Devil’s Coach-horse beetles, Peacock butterflies and a Grebe. If you would like to report a sighting then you can log it on the board in the Discovery Centre.

Insect identification

The iridescent ground beetle (Carabidae) seen being attacked by rare types of wolf spiders at Three Bridges has been identified as…  Poecilus versicolor 

Invitation to contribute to the Newsletter

Readers of this newsletter are very welcome to submit a relevant article or a letter for publication, following moderation by the newsletter editor.

Leave a light on – security

We hope you have a wonderful Christmas and New Year – and don’t forget to leave a light on when you go out enjoying yourselves.

Kind regards

David

Rudolph in Lapland

Text and all photos copyright 2019 David E P Dennis LCGI RAF

Fundraiser Friends of Combe Valley National Charity 1163581

Noah’s Local Flood!

COMBE VALLEY FLOODING – WILL IT END IN TEARS?

a blog essay by David Dennis

Will global warming and rising sea levels cause a flooding disaster in Combe Valley?  This sounds like an apocalyptic caption for a far-fetched film. What could possibly go wrong? Let us peer into the future and see what the legacy of mismanaging nature is bringing our way.

In April 2002 the UKCIP02 Scientific Report called Climate Change Scenarios for the United Kingdom was published.  It explained that the planet was getting warmer, that as a consequence of this heating (molecular vibration and spacing) the sea was expanding and rising. With an overheated energetic atmosphere causing storm surges with greater power and frequency, coastal flooding was more likely around the world.

Now our government has produced this latest report which sets out the flooding containment strategy:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/663885/Future_of_the_sea_-_sea_level_rise.pdf

The melting of sea ice north and south makes very little difference but the melting of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets is the danger. Add to this the increasing turbulence of the atmosphere and the storm surges that weather systems produce, and it can be seen that coastal, estuary and land drainage problems will increase. Sea level rise estimates vary wildly from a few centimetres to one metre within a lifetime. In addition to storm surges there are annual tidal fluctuations. If a storm surge coincided with spring tides for example, then rivers would back up and land would be flooded a long way inland, especially if rainfall had been high and river gradients are shallow – remember Somerset in 2014, for example.

Our part of England has been slowly sinking over thousands of years and many coastal harbours and marshes have been formed.  Pagham Harbour and Selsey Bill, the Cuckmere, Eastbourne and Pevensey Marshes and the Combe Haven valley are all shown as being flood-prone on the national flood maps set out by DEFRA on the internet for all to see.

Rainfall intensity in our Bexhill-Hastings-Battle-Crowhurst area is greatest in October to January with total rainfall for those 4 months in the Combe Valley being 15 inches (384mm). The ground becomes saturated and water tables are high. Since there is no regional strategy to help farmers to control run-off from fields, the water in the Combe Valley accumulates, much to the delight of wildlife observers, lovers of marshes, reed-beds and waterfowl.

But this huge volume of Combe Haven water with its Watermill and Powdermill tributaries has to get to the sea. To do this the Haven has to flow past Combe Haven Caravan Park part of which is built on its flood-plain, it then flows between Bexhill Road and Bulverhythe Road to the sluice and the sea pipe just before Bo-Peep.

The sluice can only be opened to let the water out to the sea when the tide is low enough.  Here lies the problem because the number of hours available for the sluice to be opened will depend on the height of the tide – and the tides are rising by a known amount.

In the last 100 years the sea in Sussex has risen by 10cms. Due to planetary warming, the Sussex sea level is expected to rise by 55 cms by 2080 or 85mm per year.

As the Sussex climate changes with drier summers and wetter winters, the plants and animals will be affected. Some winters may be so wet as to kill off some types of life and some summers may be so dry as to kill the roots of plants and trees in the natural environment.

In Combe Valley, the growing intensity of the rainfall within a short duration and the rising sea levels closing the sluices will leave Combe Haven Caravan Park managers to build higher and higher barriers to save their flood plain caravans.  As they do so, understandably protecting their commercial interests, the flooding of the Bexhill playing fields and homes backing onto it will get worse since the water in their kitchens would have been lower if the flood fencing had not been so high.

So what to do? Do we ask the Caravan Park owners to remove their caravans and free up the flood plain expansion point, or tell the people of Bexhill Road to move?  Is there a third or even a fourth alternative?

Pumping the Combe Haven excess flooding at a very fast rate during low tide times will cost money but it is obvious that a powerful pump could keep water levels lower than they are now despite rising sea levels. Powerful pumps cost money. There is little government money available for such engineering, but Hastings Borough Council is looking at loaning money (£6 million?) to pay for such pumps so that they can build a housing estate on Bexhill Recreation Ground.

A fourth alternative would be to ask the farmers to plant more trees and cut more ditches to slow the run-off of rainwater. But harsh strategies such as turning the Combe Valley into a permanent lake or reservoir would just mean the total loss of all farmland and the Haven is not suitable for building a dam in any case as the valley has such a broad front. Using the part-natural choke point between the hill made by the now closed tip and the hill slope of the caravan site would mean the total removal of the caravan site – and in any case the water would flow out through Pebsham and Sidley and the stream at Crowhurst would back up, flooding the cricket ground. At the end of the last Ice Age, Combe Valley was tidal to Filsham Reed Beds and so it would become again. A salt marsh would develop similar to that planned for the Cuckmere which has had its flood defences removed.

So pumping seems to be the short-term answer with the money for this found from private sources perhaps.

How long have we got before disaster strikes? The forecast for Pagham Harbour and East Head nature reserve at Chichester is that the next big storm surge will destroy these two landmarks permanently. Along the Bexhill coast to Hastings, there are clear signs of concern as the beach is supported by rocks to save the railway and the Fairlight cliffs topple into the sea on live TV. Even the wavecut platform of sandstone rocks and the petrified forest at Bexhill are collapsing, with huge pieces breaking off – never seen before in my lifetime.

I am personally convinced about global warming. I have walked on the Greenland icecap and seen its erosion and lived on and mapped the retreating glaciers of the Okstind range in north Norway, so I can safely say that Nature is coming to get us. When you sleep on a glacier, the night is silent but by noon to 3pm the whole surface is melting – thundering and roaring down through cavities to lubricate the underneath and make the glacial ice flow faster to the sea. If the Greenland icecap melted totally the sea would rise by a small amount, but – as the UKCIP02 Scientific Report states, if the whole West Antarctic ice-sheet melted the sea would rise by 5 metres and Bexhill would be taken over by fishes.

As a conservative estimate, the government is looking at a range of a few centimetres to 2.5 metres for Britain. So a local debate is required. There will be more winter rain, higher tides and more storm surges for sure. What shall we do about it?  Shall we continue to build homes along the coast? Your comments are welcome.

I will publish some of them in my blog – maybe in shortened form but without personal names unless you say not to in your replies to this blog essay.

Kind regards to all

David